feature

Beware of the Fourteen Year Cycle

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by: Linggoy Alcuaz

AS column titles go, my column last week, “Six Decades of Politics and Protest” would have been more appropriate for this week. My title for this week should have been the title last week. A few Wednesdays ago, the Fernandina Media Forum at Club Filipino featured Jun Lozada as a Guest and Resource Person. Jun is now known as the “Crying Whistle Blower”. Among his original supporters, many who also supported Noynoy for President in May 2010, are now sorry, sour and sore that they supported Noynoy and the Liberals.

(Photo credit: http://malacanang.gov.ph/1608-the-protocol-ceremony-history-and-symbolism-of-the-presidential-inauguration/)

Jun called our attention to the fourteen year cycle, examples of which I listed down and narrated last week. I did not limit myself to strict numerology. I also went ahead and listed down thirteen, twelve and fifteen year cycles. Actually, I could go down to ten years and up to twenty years. Actually, I believe in one to two decades as the necessary length of time to form a cycle in Politics and Protest. #OpinYon #opinion

read cont | http://bit.ly/16NieFL

(image used under Creative Commons)

AWOL

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(photo source: http://girleavesdropper.wordpress.com/)
(photo source: http://girleavesdropper.wordpress.com/)

By Miguel Raymundo

PRESIDENT Aquino’s choice to stay in the Zamboanga war zone and away from Malacañang is taking a toll on his Presidency.

With much of Zamboanga’s commercial and business facilities shut down because of continued fighting between government forces and Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) rebels, the President is unable to attend to other issues of import that require his immediate attention.

Away from the public eye since Sept. 14 when he left the Palace for Zamboanga City, many are wondering what the President is doing there and who’s running the government’s affairs while he is away.

Is the President still in control? Has he gone AWOL to escape public censure over the P10-billion pork barrel scandal? Is he just sitting around playing his video games—content to sit in the sidelines while the lives and livelihood of the people of Zamboanga lie in the balance?

And where on earth is PNoy exactly? #OpinYon#CoverStory #Pnoy #AWOL

read cont | http://bit.ly/15srVOR

Root Canal is Not Painful

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by: Dr. Joseph D. Lim

(Photo source: http://www.dentalfearcentral.org/faq/root-canal/)

WHAT most Americans fear, more than paying taxes and speaking in public, is getting a root canal treatment.

Two of three Americans surveyed by the American Association of Endodontists (AAE) also ranked root canals as the dental procedure they most fear, more than having a tooth pulled or a cavity filled.

The survey reveals that seven out of 10 (70 percent) Americans fear losing a natural tooth. Ironically, the same number also fear root canal treatment, a dental procedure that can save their teeth.

From March 27 to April 2, the AAE is holding its fifth annual Root Canal Awareness Week to dispel long-standing myths about root canal treatment and increase understanding of the procedure as one that is virtually painless. #OpinYon #LifeStyle

read cont | http://bit.ly/16ke5ch

No to Pork! Yes to Hainanese Chicken!

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by: Ramon M. Borromeo

MY wife and I received a last minute invitation from our dining partners to join them at what is practically a hole-in-the-wall restaurant called Happi Hen on Aguirre Avenue in BF Homes Paranaque. I forget the corner street it is on but it is right beside Panaderia Pantoja.

When we got there rather late, thanks to traffic, our hosts and their granddaughter had already ordered ahead. Since we tend to eat a lot more collectively, my wife and I ordered an additional order each of what was already on hand.

On hand was the house specialty, Hainanese Chicken (a whole quarter for P130.00), which is a complete meal in itself. Hainanese Chicken is simply simmered in initially boiling water with salt and ginger for a little less than 30 minutes. Thereafter the chicken is removed and plunged in ice water until it is no longer hot. Around 12 to 15 minutes should be adequate time. The chicken is then removed and hung to drip dry. Later on, the chicken is to be served at room temperature with hot flavoured rice and soup. #OpinYon #Living #food

read cont | http://bit.ly/19CJHuB

Mother Figures: Filipino matriarchs in new local films

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by: Boy Villasanta

IN the recently concluded maiden edition of the Film Development Council of the Philippines’ Sineng Pambansa National Film Festival, alternately dubbed as All Masters Film Festival, participated in by the country’s veteran directors, Filipino matriarchs were once again painted and presented in multi-colored and multi-dimensional types.

These were, more or less, underscored in the three (out of nine official entries) films we’ve watched.

In Gil M. Portes’ “Ang Tag-Araw ni Twinkle,” there were at least two mothers, one, Twinkle’s (Ellen Adarna) biological mom, a New People’s Army amazon who was shot dead by a junior military official during an encounter in the boondocks her baby wrapped in cloth around her chest during the fatal shootout, the other, the adoptive ma (Rina Reyes), the wife of senior officer General Payawal (Cris Villanueva).

In Jose Javier Reyes’ “Anong Kulay ang mga Nakalimutang Pangarap?,” there was one matriarch (each generation played intermittently by Madeleine Nicolas and Kimberly Diaz) and a surrogate one, the nanny Teresa (Rustica Carpio). #OpinYon #ePlus #entertainment

read cont | http://bit.ly/19xY9Fm

Swiss Ambassador to the Philippines Ivo Sieber: IN LOVE WITH THE PHILIPPINES

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ABOUT 10,530 kilometers of land and ocean separate the Philippines from Switzerland. But in an instant, Filipinos can easily answer what comes to mind when they hear “Swiss”—the Swiss knife, chocolate, cheese, watch, and the Swiss Alps.
Many generations of Pinoys have been raised on products made by the Swiss food and beverage giant Nestle and treated for various ailments using Swiss-manufactured medicines.
Fact is, Switzerland has had official relations with the Philippines since 1862, when the Philippines was still a Spanish colony and most of our revolutionary heroes were still toddlers. The Swiss Consulate in the Philippines was the very first consulate in Asia and have maintained consular offices here until today.
Their man in Manila today is Ambassador Ivo Sieber. And, the Philippines is close to Sieber’s heart because he has been married for some 20 years now to Gracita—a beautiful Filipina with whom he has two teenaged girls. #OpinYon #Foreign #Swiss

read cont | http://bit.ly/14F88t2

Mindanao Conflagration

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By Herman Tiu-Laurel

IN AUGUST of 2012 at the height of peace talks between the GRP (Government of the Republic of the Philippines) and the MILF (Moro Islamic Liberation Front), the two negotiating parties belittled the possibility that the forces of Nur Misuari and the MNLF (Moro National Liberation Front) and Amerail Umbra Kato’s BIFF (Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters) could derail the talks.

The convulsions the past week in Mindanao shows the folly of the government and MILF’s presumptuous disregard for the other stakeholders in Mindanao’s future. Then chief GRP negotiator and now Supreme Court Justice Marvic Leonen said, “As far as Nur forces, it is nothing we are too bothered about.”

On August 12, 2013 MNLF founding Chairman Nur Misuari declared the establishment of the United Federated States of Bangsamoro Republik in in his Sulu stronghold, envisioning a territory consisting of Mindanao, Basilan, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi, Palawan, and Sabah. This declaration came amidst the final stages of peace negotiations between the GRP and MILF to set up the Bangsamoro Political Entity that will replace the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) that became part of the 1987 Philippine Constitution and created by law through Republic Act No. 6734 known as the ARMM Organic Act.

continuation | http://bit.ly/1a2XwES

Indonesia Ambassador to the Philippines Yohanes Kristiarto Soeryo Legowo: A MAN AHEAD OF HIS TIME

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DIPLOMATS are—usually—strict about time. When they don’t arrive in time for their appointments, they come early.

This is literally the case of Yohanes Kristiarto Soeryo Legowo, Indonesia’s Ambassador to the Philippines. Born on the 27th of December in 1962, about a week earlier than his mother’s due date, you could say that it is in his providence to become an ambassador.

Known as Kris to fellow diplomats, friends and associates—his arrival to the family came as a big relief (hence the name Legowo—meaning “big relief” in Javanese). His mother fainted and fell while in church two days before he was born and the accident required stitches on her neck and triggered the contractions.
The youngest in a brood of 10, Legowo became the hands-down favorite in the family.

“I could not deny that everybody was always trying to spoil me.… But doesn’t make me a spoiled child,” Legowo said in a magazine interview last year. But while he has had his share of being pinched in the ear for being naughty, he admitted that he did not really enjoy the overprotectiveness of his parents, brothers and sisters. “But in the end, I put it in a very positive perspective. They did it because they love me,” he said.

His father, Soeryo, was a teacher who imparted to them the value of education. So despite the bouts of teenage rebellion and other misbehaviors—Legowo grew up a decent young man.

“All the values of life I learned it from the family. My father taught us how to pursue dream,” Kris said. “But he always emphasized also that the way we pursue our dream is also important…being Christian, process is very important.” #OpinYon#Indonesia #Foreign

cont | http://bit.ly/17IqauD